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IRS Announces 2018 Retirement Plan Contribution Limits | PA Benefit Advisors

On October 19, 2017, the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) released Notice 2017-64 announcing cost-of-living adjustments affecting dollar limitations for pension plans and other retirement-related items. The following is a summary of the limits for tax year 2018.

For 401(k), 403(b), and most 457 plans and the federal government’s Thrift Savings Plans:

  • The elective deferral (contribution) limit increases to $18,500 for 2018 (from $18,000 for 2017).
  • The catch-up contribution limit for employees aged 50 and over who participate in these plans remains at $6,000.

For individual retirement arrangements (IRAs):

  • The limit on annual contributions remains unchanged at $5,500 for 2018.
  • The additional catch-up contribution limit for individuals aged 50 and over is not subject to an annual cost-of-living adjustment and remains $1,000 for 2018.

For simplified employee pension (SEP) IRAs and individual/solo 401(k) plans:

  • Elective deferrals increase to $55,000 for 2018, based on an annual compensation limit of $275,000 (up from the 2017 amounts of $54,000 and $270,000).
  • The minimum compensation that may be required for participation in a SEP remains unchanged at $600 for 2018.

For savings incentive match plan for employees (SIMPLE) IRAs:

  • The contribution limit on SIMPLE IRA retirement accounts remains unchanged at $12,500 for 2018.
  • The SIMPLE catch-up limit remains unchanged at $3,000 for 2018.

For defined benefit plans:

  • The basic limitation on the annual benefits under a defined benefit plan is increased to $220,000 for 2018 (from $215,000 for 2017).

Other changes:

  • Highly-compensated and key employee thresholds:
    • The threshold for determining “highly compensated employees” remains unchanged at $120,000 for 2018.
    • The threshold for officers who are “key employees” in a top-heavy plan remains unchanged at $175,000 for 2018.
  • Social Security cost of living adjustment: In a separate announcement, the Social Security Administration stated that the taxable wage base will increase to $128,700 for 2018, an increase of $1,500 from the 2017 taxable wage base of $127,200. Thus, with respect to higher-income employees, the maximum Social Security tax liability will increase slightly for both the employee and employer.

The chart below summarizes some of the more common adjustments to employer-sponsored retirement plans.

Originally posted by www.ThinkHR.com

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